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Papers

Burton, Tristesse [1], Dunlap, Tareisha [1], Dong, Huali [3], Li, Guannan [3], Bolton, Judy [3], Soejarto, Djaja [3], van Breemen, Richard [3].

American Indian Botanicals as Possible Alternatives to Hormone Therapy during Menopause.

Although pharmaceutical hormone therapy (HT) remains the standard clinical treatment for managing menopausal symptoms, many women seek alternatives such as botanical dietary supplements because HT has been associated with increased risks of breast cancer, coronary heart disease and stroke. The leading botanicals that women take for menopause are black cohosh and red clover, which were also traditionally used by American Indian women. While these two botanicals have been investigated extensively, there are still numerous American Indian plants that lack scientific studies on their safety and efficacy and current ethnobotanical relevance. In collaboration with the Chicago Botanic Garden, 15 Illinois-native plants were evaluated for potential women’s health-related benefits. Out of the 15 species, Amorpha canescens Pursh. (Fabaceae) - leadplant, Echinocystis lobata (Michx.) Torr. & A. Gray (Cucurbitaceae) - wild cucumber, and Silphium perfoliatum L. (Asteraceae) - cup plant inflorescent tissue were screened for estrogenicity, chemopreventive, and anti-inflammatory potential based on previously published American Indian ethnobotany and biological data. Leadplant’s MeOH extract was selected as the best candidate for bioassay-guided fractionation due to dose-dependent (40, 20, 10, 5, 2.5, 1.25 g/mL) anti-estrogenic and anti-inflammatory activity in the Ishikawa and Griess assays (n=9). Cup plant and Lespedeza capitata Mixch. (Fabaceae) – roundhead lespedeza (chosen from the remaining 12 species) will be pursued as alternatives. Currently, bioassay guided-fractionation is being performed on leadplant’s MeOH extract to ascertain the active constituents. Also, ethnobotanical studies will be performed with American Indian women in the Chicago region to identify current medicinal uses for the investigated plants.


1 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
2 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Department of Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
3 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
4 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
5 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
6 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA
7 - University of Illinois at Chicago, UIC/NIH Center for Botanical Dietar, Medicinal Chemistry and Pharmacognosy, 833 South Wood Street, Chicago, IL, 60612, USA

Keywords:
American Indian ethnobotany
menopause
phytoestrogen.

Presentation Type: Oral Presentation
Number:
Abstract ID:75
Candidate for Awards:None