Abstract Detail



Poster Session

Ezekiel, Dr. Folorunso Abayomi [1], Salako, Omotoyosi Abidemi [1].

Ethnobotanical Study of Domestic Plants in Osogbo, Ile-Ife and Ilesa Areas of Osun State in Nigeria.

A checlist was made on the ethnobotanical studies of some domestic plants. The study was carried out in Ile-Ife, Ilesa and Osogbo environs. This ethnobotanical study was conducted in order to find out why people domesticate these plants in their environments and the level of intimacy of people with the plants. Questionnaires were structured in such a way that adequate information was acquired from people showing their familiarity with these plants and the usage of various parts of these plants. The result revealed that almost every plant has one role or the other to perform in nature even if the roles of some were not known. Gliricidia sepium was observed to be the most diverse of all the plants in consideration and the most commonly used in various environments. It is majorly important for construction of sheds for mechanics and traders. Calotropis procera was majorly found to be a wild species as it was encountered in various locations where it was not planted, but was not uprooted because of its importance in milk brewing. Elaeis guineensis is known to be vast in its importance and its value cannot be over emphasized, since all its parts are useful economically. Knowledge of information about plants should be passed around in order to make people who are ignorant to be aware of it. Ethnobotanical study shows that plants are highly valuable and useful for various purposes such as landmarks, shed, traditional purposes and most of them even have several medicinal values for treatment of several ailments like fever, cough and so on. This documentation is therefore a necessary step towards the goal of raising awareness in local communities about the importance of these plants and their further conservation.


1 - Obafemi Awolowo University, Botany, Nigeria

Keywords:
ethnobotany
Domestic
plants
Nigeria
conservation.

Presentation Type: Poster
Number:
Abstract ID:43
Candidate for Awards:None